History

History

Nazi Who Didn’t Follow Orders

A story of redemption Albert Battel was a Nazi officer who turned against the party after witnessing the liquidation of a Jewish ghetto in Poland and atoned for past sins by saving 100 Jewish families. Born in 1891 in Prussian Silesia, Albert served in the German Army in World War I. After the war, he attended law school and worked as an attorney in Breslau. In the early 1930’s, as Hitler rose to power in Germany, Albert heard the Nazi leader speak and was inspired by his message of German pride and unity after the humiliating defeat in the Great War. Albert joined the Nazi Party in 1933 and served as a Lieutenant in the Wehrmacht army reserves. In 1942, Albert was called up from the reserves at age 51. He was sent to Prsemysl, Poland to help liquidate the Jewish ghetto there. Albert was h...

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‘The Life of Hitler’: A Documentary Chronicling the Life of a Mustachioed Monster

This weekend, Newsmax TV presents a special documentary on the life of a mustachioed monster who attempted to take over the world with his twisted ideology of creating a “master race.” “The Life of Hitler” airs Sunday, September 9, at 4 p.m./ET, only on Newsmax TV, your No. 1 source for breaking news, hard-hitting opinion, and acclaimed documentaries.

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Who Were the Real Slave Owners At the Height of Slavery? – Not At All Who You Think

This includes slave owners that were white, native American and black. All three peoples owned slaves.

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A Patriot’s Thoughts: What if? No Borders, No Sovereignty and No Truth!

I’m back! After five very exciting months researching, compiling and preparing my family’s history, my work with it is done. And yes, it feels like there is a void in my life now that it has been published and distributed. The last thing on my mind going into this week was to write an editorial, but so much misinformation is being spewed regarding our border, protecting it and our sovereignty, my message is screaming to be put down in writing.

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The 1995 Law Behind President Trump’s Plan to Move the U.S. Embassy in Israel to Jerusalem

Every six months for more than two decades, U.S. presidents have had to decide all over again whether to move the U.S. embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. Since the Clinton administration, they decided each time to keep the embassy where it is, seeking not to throw a wrench into delicate Middle East peace talks. On Tuesday, however, after signing a waiver putting off the move in June, President Donald Trump informed the Palestinian Authority’s President Mahmoud Abbas that he’s going to recognize the contested holy city as Israel’s capital and begin the process of moving the embassy there.

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Victims of the red revolution: The haunting faces of prisoners worked to death in Stalin’s slave camps emerge as 100th anniversary of 1917 Bolshevik takeover approaches

Trudging through mud in sub-zero temperatures, digging the earth with their bare hands and heaving huge rocks with the most primitive of tools, these horrifying photos have revealed life inside Joseph Stalin’s gulag prisons, where people were worked to death in Soviet labour camps through the mid-1900s. This year marks 100 years since the 1917 Russian Revolution, which led to Vladimir Lenin taking control of the Soviet Union. When Lenin died in 1924, Stalin rose to power and became the state’s authoritarian leader.  Between 1929 and the year of Stalin’s death in 1953, 18million men and women were transported to Soviet slave labour camps in Siberia and other outposts of the Red empire – many of them never to return.  

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New Research Suggests Christmas Story of Visit by Wise Men Was ‘Historically True’

Despite attempts by modern biblical scholarship to debunk the gospel account of three magi visiting the newborn Jesus in Bethlehem, the stories were “historically true” according to extensive research by author Dwight Longenecker.  In his new book, Mystery of the Magi: The Quest to Identify the Three Wise Men, Longenecker, a scholar and Catholic priest, states that an impartial study of the relevant data “shows beyond reasonable doubt” that the Magi of Matthew’s gospel were historical figures.  For many years, Longenecker writes, skeptical scholars have rejected the possibility that the infancy stories about Jesus could be historical for a number of reasons, such as the fact that they contain supernatural elements.

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American Minute Betty Ross Day

A 3-cent stamphonoring Betsy Ross was issued in Philadelphia, JANUARY 2, 1952, commemorating the 200th anniversary of her birth.

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We Elect a President: The Story of Our Electoral College

America’s unique presidential election system is often misunderstood-and perhaps especially hard to explain to our children. “We Elect a President: The Story of Our Electoral College” will help you and your family discover more about the Electoral College and its remarkable history. Why was it created in the first place? Does it still work today? Written in straightforward language and complemented with playful illustrations, “We Elect a President” explains how the Electoral College works and why it is still needed in a great, diverse country such as our own

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This Day in History: George Washington’s second battle at Trenton

On this day in 1777, the “second battle of Trenton” occurs. The Americans had won an astounding victory a mere one week earlier. Now, the British were back, trying to recover the ground they’d lost. Much had happened in one short week. On December 25, Washington’s men made a difficult trip across the Delaware River. On the 26th, they launched a surprise attack on Trenton and won, against all odds. After their victory, the Americans had returned back across the Delaware, taking their prisoners of war with them. Word spread about Washington’s victory. He was extolled as a hero.  

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James Madison

James Madison, Jr. was an American politician and the fourth President of the United States (1809–1817), and one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. Madison was the last founding father to die. Considered to be the “Father of the Constitution”, he was the principal author of the document. In 1788, he wrote over a third of the Federalist Papers, still the most influential commentary on the Constitution. As a leader in the first Congresses, he drafted many basic laws and was responsible for the first ten amendments to the Constitution (said to be based on the Virginia Declaration of Rights), and thus is also known as the “Father of the Bill of Rights”.

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