Constitution

Constitution

Canceling the Constitution: Biden hailed for violating rule of law to extend eviction moratorium

During the 2020 presidential campaign, then-candidate Joe Biden told voters that the choice between him and Donald Trump was between the lawful and the lawless. He called for voters to support “the rule of law, our Constitution,” a choice repeated mantralike by the media to “end Trump’s assault on the rule of law.” Now, six months into his presidency, Biden is openly flouting the Constitution with a knowingly invalid extension of the eviction moratorium — and some law professors and advocates on the left are cheering him for it. A few weeks ago, the Supreme Court ruled on the authority of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to impose a nationwide moratorium on the eviction of renters during the pandemic. Some of us criticized the CDC order as uncons...

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Where Did Politicians Get the Authority to Violate the Constitutional Rights of American Citizens?

Apparently through power newly acquired in 60 days, politicians and government bureaucrats have taken courses of action that will result in objectionable and potentially devastating outcomes as we look down the road and around the corner. The prime question to be asked here is: When and where did politicians get the authority to violate the constitutional rights of American citizens?

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Donald Trump’s Constitution of One

On January 20, 2017, Chief Justice John Roberts will administer the oath of office to the 45th president: “I do solemnly swear that I will faithfully execute the Office of President of the United States, and will to the best of my ability, preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States.” Donald Trump is utterly unqualified to keep this solemn pledge to our most fundamental law. We know this because in winning the nomination, Trump has already promised that he will knowingly break the law and violate the Constitution.   

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Trump questions the legality of the Constitution

A few days ago, Republican presidential hopeful Donald Trump unveiled an actual immigration policy, which included a striking provision: “End birthright citizenship.” As regular readers know, the 14th Amendment to the Constitution doesn’t leave much in the way of wiggle room: the rights of American citizenship are given to “all persons born or naturalized in the United States.” The principle of birthright citizenship has been upheld by the Supreme Court many times since its enactment following the Civil War.  

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